Category Archives: All in a Day’s Work

Perilous times have started in our schools!

periloustimes

Quite often these days as I engage with some of my students, this passage of scripture comes to mind:

“This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy,

Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good,

Traitors, heady, high-minded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God;

Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away.”

(2 Timothy 3:1-5, King James Version)

After all, I see all of these virulent qualities manifested in the adolescents of today, not necessarily in the majority of them but certainly, in a significant and growing minority. Timothy’s dismal prophecy appears to be coming to pass right before my very eyes.

I am therefore compelled to ask: Are we indeed in perilous times? Are we experiencing the last days? I say no way! I would never accept the notion of “last days”. This is a world without end! I may concede however, that these may be “perilous times”. But, as my mother often said, “Everything is only for a time.” Things will get better!

In the meantime, I have to find a way to deal with these covetous, proud, disobedient, unthankful, and unholy adolescents; who, according to Timothy are: “Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce,” and “despisers of those that are good…”

As a teacher, how should I respond to the fulfilment of prophecy? How can I make a difference? Should I take Timothy’s advice and “turn away”? Trust me, there are days on which I am tempted to! But, am afraid I cannot and will not turn away! I think that the bulk of our teenagers are inherently good. They however, need good guidance and an excellent education designed to steer them away from the fate described by Timothy.

For now, the times in our schools may appear perilous. But, with committed educators and caring parents, we are bound to make it better for the sake of our children. Do not turn away from them!

Should parents accept lines as a form of punishment?

Several years ago in my first year at the St. Vincent Grammar School, I was ordered to write 500 lines by my beloved geography teacher, Mr Terry Cole. This was his strategy for dealing with some infraction on my part. I cannot remember the behaviour that Mr Cole was trying to correct. But, I remember his punishment as if it were yesterday.

I think it started with a paltry 100. And for reasons I still cannot recall, the number reached up to 500. Yes, 500 lines! Now, these had to be, as Mr Cole put it, “continuous lines”! This meant that I was not given a sentence to write out repeatedly for 500 times. Instead, I had to write in continuous prose until the desired number of lines in my big hard cover notebook were filled…500! We solved the problem of what to write by copying the contents of a textbook until we reached the desired number of lines…in this case, 500!

I can’t recall how long it took me to complete that assignment. But, I do remember this: Mr Cole came to collect and I was not quite finished. In the exchange, I somehow let it slip that my mother assisted me. Big mistake! Mr Cole berated me and had me start all over! I cried like a baby.

I have been teaching for 36 plus years now and I DO NOT give students lines to write. I think it is a stupid form of punishment! Parents should unite and rebel against it.

By the way, Mr Terry Cole is still one of my favourite teachers of all times. I have fond memories of his geography classes.

Are teachers permitted to be sexy?

sexy teacher5

How far should our teachers go when it comes to dressing for the classroom? I refer particularly to our female teachers. They are the ones who tend to raise some eyebrows in this regard.

Despite the widely held notion that teachers are expected to be the standard bearers of conservatism in conduct and appearance, a growing number of our teachers have rejected this, especially the dress part. Instead, it’s all about the latest fashion; it’s all about being seen as sexy; and in the world of social media, it’s all about attracting “likes”!

In St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the competent authorities have set clear rules on how public officers, including teachers, are expected to dress for work. According to the Civil Service Orders, the following mode of dress is acceptable for women:

Dresses of sober style and cut. Pants suits and pants with tops.
Shoes – no slippers.

Teacher

Some may convincingly argue that the Civil Service Orders are woefully out of date and are not befitting the times in which we now live. Hence, we must prepare to embrace contemporary style and fashion in the workplace.

For some teachers, modern fashion means the skimpiest of the skimpy dresses; the shortest of short skirts; the tightest of tight pants and the exposure of as much bare skin as the market can bear. I must admit that they all tend to look absolutely fantastic, gorgeous, beautiful and indeed sexy!

sexy teacher4

The questions remain: Are these teachers going too far? Should the authorities put some limit on how sexy our female teachers are permitted to present themselves in the classroom?

Please, tell me, how sexy are teachers permitted to be?

5 Simple Social Media Rules for Principals

The use of social media is pervasive throughout our school system. From kindergarten to college’ every student, every teacher, the ancillary staff and yes, some principals have a social media account. However, many of us frown on the idea of making social media an integral part of school management and operations. It seems as if principals, in particular, are the ones who refuse to lead in this regard. Permit me to share with you an article (slightly adapted)  from the site School Leaders Now It gives some ideas on the use of social media by principals 

social media etiquette rules for school leaders

It’s okay to use social media as a principal or member of your school’s leadership, but your posts do need to be above reproach. Following these five simple social media etiquette rules can help you maintain a Facebook and social media presence without looking unprofessional.

1. Separate your personal/work accounts

Using your personal media accounts to stay in touch with family and friends with careful privacy boundary settings is one way to maintain social media. However, many schools additionally have social media accounts set up for their administrators and teachers. Those accounts are designed for disseminating information to your school families, teachers and staff. Be careful not to post personal updates to your school-assigned accounts. A school-provided social media account can be an excellent way to update but also a way to keep updated and share resources throughout the school’s community

2. Avoid favouritism and don’t tag anyone

Follow the authorities’ social media policy and media release guidelines when posting any photographs and videos. This is especially important if they mention school employees, students, or families. School leaders need to follow all rules of conduct in posting images or updates, even from your school-provided social media account. It’s also a good idea to avoid tagging or posting pictures of others. It’s okay if you socialize with any staff or families outside of school, but avoid posting any images or tagging them. This ensures they can maintain their privacy and you do not show favoritism toward certain students, teachers, or employees.

3. Lead by example

Your teachers, staff, parents and even students are watching your social media posts. Make sure to write positively in your posts and share updates showing pride in your school.  Also, never post under the influence or while in a compromising situation. Keep a professional distance despite the temptation to share vacation pictures or comment on pictures from your teachers or families. Lead by example. Share things that are similar to what you expect your teachers or staff to share. Fill your feed with positive posts and educational resources.

4. Join professional groups

Use social media to your best advantage as a principal by joining online organizations for support and resources. Teachers and staff may use social media for lesson plans and other helpful teaching options. Make sure the resources you find fit within curriculum guidelines and are reviewed for content. Some online options with social media for principals include: ISTEASCDNAESPNASSP, and NEA. Finally, consider how others will view your professionalism when they view the groups you belong to on Facebook, LinkedIn, or other social media platforms.

5. Control your privacy, monitor privacy laws

Carefully control your social media privacy settings and keep up with changes to privacy settings. Make your posts private and available only to your established social media friends outside of the school setting. Also, keep an eye out for intrusive, negative, or inappropriate followers on your own social media posts/pages. As an administrator, you should also take special note of applicable laws related to privacy and cyber bullying in all posts from you, your staff, teachers, and other administrators.

Taking advantage of social media as a school leader can introduce resources and improve professional communication at your school site and throughout the district. It’s one way to begin building a positive culture at your school.

 

Amy Barnes

Retrieved from: https://schoolleadersnow.weareteachers.com/social-media-etiquette-tips-school-leadership/

5 Simple Social Media Rules for Principals

The use of social media is pervasive throughout our school system. From kindergarten to college’ every student, every teacher, the ancillary staff and yes, some principals have a social media account. However, many of us frown on the idea of making social media an integral part of school management and operations. It seems as if principals, in particular, are the ones who refuse to lead in this regard. Permit me to share with you an article (slightly adapted)  from the site School Leaders Now It gives some ideas on the use of social media by principals 

social media etiquette rules for school leaders

It’s okay to use social media as a principal or member of your school’s leadership, but your posts do need to be above reproach. Following these five simple social media etiquette rules can help you maintain a Facebook and social media presence without looking unprofessional.

1. Separate your personal/work accounts

Using your personal media accounts to stay in touch with family and friends with careful privacy boundary settings is one way to maintain social media. However, many schools additionally have social media accounts set up for their administrators and teachers. Those accounts are designed for disseminating information to your school families, teachers and staff. Be careful not to post personal updates to your school-assigned accounts. A school-provided social media account can be an excellent way to update but also a way to keep updated and share resources throughout the school’s community

2. Avoid favouritism and don’t tag anyone

Follow the authorities’ social media policy and media release guidelines when posting any photographs and videos. This is especially important if they mention school employees, students, or families. School leaders need to follow all rules of conduct in posting images or updates, even from your school-provided social media account. It’s also a good idea to avoid tagging or posting pictures of others. It’s okay if you socialize with any staff or families outside of school, but avoid posting any images or tagging them. This ensures they can maintain their privacy and you do not show favoritism toward certain students, teachers, or employees.

3. Lead by example

Your teachers, staff, parents and even students are watching your social media posts. Make sure to write positively in your posts and share updates showing pride in your school.  Also, never post under the influence or while in a compromising situation. Keep a professional distance despite the temptation to share vacation pictures or comment on pictures from your teachers or families. Lead by example. Share things that are similar to what you expect your teachers or staff to share. Fill your feed with positive posts and educational resources.

4. Join professional groups

Use social media to your best advantage as a principal by joining online organizations for support and resources. Teachers and staff may use social media for lesson plans and other helpful teaching options. Make sure the resources you find fit within curriculum guidelines and are reviewed for content. Some online options with social media for principals include: ISTEASCDNAESPNASSP, and NEA. Finally, consider how others will view your professionalism when they view the groups you belong to on Facebook, LinkedIn, or other social media platforms.

5. Control your privacy, monitor privacy laws

Carefully control your social media privacy settings and keep up with changes to privacy settings. Make your posts private and available only to your established social media friends outside of the school setting. Also, keep an eye out for intrusive, negative, or inappropriate followers on your own social media posts/pages. As an administrator, you should also take special note of applicable laws related to privacy and cyber bullying in all posts from you, your staff, teachers, and other administrators.

Taking advantage of social media as a school leader can introduce resources and improve professional communication at your school site and throughout the district. It’s one way to begin building a positive culture at your school.

 

Amy Barnes

Retrieved from: https://schoolleadersnow.weareteachers.com/social-media-etiquette-tips-school-leadership/

10 Critical Personality Traits Required of Teachers

terrible teacher

There are several terrible teachers at work in our schools today. at they are unfit for purpose! Yet, they are called teachers. In all fairness, I do not think that many of the so called want to be teachers. Nevertheless, they are here wreaking havoc in the system.

I have racked my brain trying to figure out what could be responsible for the dismal performances so evident among many persons who call themselves teachers. Indeed, it is extremely difficult for me to come up with answers. Furthermore, it would take much more than this blog to catalogue  the litany of concerns with many of today’s teachers. What I can do in the meantime, however, is to make a list of critical personality traits that I would like to see demonstrated by fellow teachers.

Without giving it much thought, the following spring to mind immediately:

  1. Intelligence
  2. Creativity
  3. Resourcefulness
  4. Eloquence
  5. Compassion
  6. Empathy
  7. Commitment
  8. Curiosity
  9. Dedication
  10. Discipline

Of course, there are several teachers in our classrooms who demonstrate these traits and more. I work with some of them. They must be commended, encouraged and rewarded. Unfortunately, their work often go unnoticed.

A student loan default crisis in SVG?

student loan

The National Student Loan Programme has published a list of names and addresses of persons who have apparently defaulted on student loans over the years. In a press release carried in the Searchlight on Friday July 28, 2017, a number of persons were asked to contact the Ministry of Education by August 31, 2017.  While the release did not specifically identify these persons as defaulters, it is generally assumed that they are being summoned to make good on their commitments to the programme.

There were 112 persons named on the published list. It comprised 76 males and 36 females. The listed addresses indicated a spread throughout the entire country. The graphic below shows the distribution according to constituencies. One person’s address was listed as Canada.

Untitled

Distribution of Student Loan Defaulters According to Constituency

The publication of this list has generated quite a lot of discussion on social media. Some person  are totally against the move to, as they put it,  “name and shame” our young people. Then, there are those who think that it was neecessary to bring attention to what is emerging as an important isssue.

It would be interesting to find out why so many persons have chosen to default on loans granted to them to pursue studies. Is it a question of inability to pay back? Or, is it a question of unwillingness to pay. Whatever the situation, it must be negatively impacting on the sustainability of the National Student Loan Programme.

Most, if not all,  of the persons named on the list are gainfully employed right here in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Others have apparently migrated in search of better opportunities. Whatever the case, they clearly do not consider repayment of their student loan to be high on their list of priorities. It does not matter to them  that refusal to pay puts the progammme in jeopardy and stymies the chances of other young people seeking to finance their college and university education.

As a grateful beneficiary of similar student loans in the past, both as a student and as the parent of a student, I am in full support of any measure taken by the authorities to get persons to honour their debts in this regard,

To those who have criticized the publication of the list, I say, stop complaining! If there is anyone whom you know on the list, call them up and urge them to meet their commitments. It is the patriotic thing to do.

Finally, if any of the defaulters are reading this, do the right thing and pay up!

Are teachers abusing school phones?

Several schools across the state have been affacted by the programme of disconnection for unpaid bills recently carried out by LIME. We have since learnt that the unpaid bills had nothing to do with the government’s lack of resources or inability to pay. Instead, it is a question of poor mangement and abuse.

The abuse of the phone service in government departments and agencies including school is rampant! That is the conventional view. In the case of schools we must accept the fact that phone bills are high due partly or wholly to abuse by teachers. Should we sit back and accept this view?

Pause for a moment and consider the following points:

  1. Since about 2005 every single teacher is in possession of one or two or even three mobile phones.
  2. The preferred mobile phone or similar device for your average teacher is a smartphone (BlackBerry, iPhone etc).
  3. The preferred modes of communication is texting or “bbming”, or chatting on MSN and Yahoo Messenger.  Note: The phone is hardly ever used for “talking”.
  4. It is easier and safer to gossip with a colleague, friends and family using a mobile handset instead of using the school phone which is invariably an old time fixed line handset situated in a public place.
  5. Most, if not all fixed lines in schools are on a the “flat fee” plan and are generally barred from making calls to mobile phones and overseas numbers.

In this context, it is difficult to figure out why and how a teacher would abuse a school phone. The old land line is simply no longer the preferred means of communicating. This is the 21st century; it is the age of FB and Twitter! Why would any teacher go into the office or staff room and spend hours on the school phone?

Call me daft! But, it just does not make any sense to me!

Toward Paperless Schools in St. Vincent and the Grenadines

This piece is not about the digitalization of school processes and the consequent reduction in the use of paper; it is not about the integration of ICT into the curriculum with the use of digital media; it is not even about the widespread use of laptops, net-books or i-pads that threatens to make obsolete the paper bound text; it is not even about the scarcity of copy paper and the continued reliance on the chalkboard for writing up notes, tests, notices etc. No my dear colleagues, my reflections today refer to a matter of much greater import. My article is about the growing absence of toilet paper in schools across St. Vincent and the Grenadines!

This reality hit me in the face the other day when I noticed that an unusually high number of students, particularly females, kept coming to my office in search of “a piece ah toylit papah please sah”. I had no problem. I have been going “paper-less” in that regard for some time now. So, I had no difficulty in liberally sharing my supply with those who sought the item. The last time I checked, I was completely out.

Then, at an emergency staff meeting a few days ago, the scarcity of toilet paper in the school was accorded priority status on the agenda! The principal expressed concerned about the rapidity with which this precious item seemed to be disappearing. Bails of toilet paper are depleted in a matter of days. Information gleaned from colleagues around the country suggests that this may well be a nation wide trend.

As one who has an interest in educational research, I have an impulse to conduct some investigation in to the issue. Why is toilet paper so scarce in our schools? Has the Ministry of Education been cutting back on the supply? Does it have anything to do with the global economic crisis? Are our schools generating so much filth that an inordinate amount of toilet paper is necessary? Or is it that teachers are taking home the school’s supply of toilet paper?

Going paperless is a notion normally associated with the digital age. Naturally, St. Vincent and the Grenadines will not be left behind. Apart from the distribution of net-books to teachers and students, we appear to be cutting back significantly on the use of toilet paper. Perhaps we have found a way to digitize all sanitary activities!

As one writer states: “paperless doesn’t mean no paper. It means simply that technology is giving us new options to reduce or eliminate much of the paper we use today and to enjoy the cost savings that result. Moreover, it gives us the satisfaction of introducing ourselves and our students to the increased portability and accessibility of digitized ideas and to a greener way of doing business”.

Trust the people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines to embrace the concept of the “paperless school”. But, must we begin with the elimination of toilet paper?

Keep your “man prablems” out of the classroom!

Teaching for me still remains quite a noble profession.  After nearly 30 years in the service of our youth, I still have the drive,  the passion, the energy and the motivation to make a positive  difference in the lives of my students.  But, as the days go by, this is becoming quite a daunting task.

Among the biggest challenges facing me and several young, bright, talented and committed teachers is the despicable decline in discipline and decorum among the student population we pledge to serve.  Several youngsters are downwright rude and disrecpectful.  They have absolutely no regard for anyone, human or divine. 

Just yesterday  a young female colleague attempted to admonish an otherwise unruly class.  The unfortunate young lady probably made a remark that some elements in the class found to be “offensive”.  In response to the pleading of the teacher for some quietude and order, a girl in the class blurted out, “She ah behave like she ha man prablems”.

This was an unapologetic remark directed to my young colleague; delivered  without fear or trepidation.  Clearly, who the hell is Miss to tell them anything?  Why should Miss bring her “man prablems” to the class?  What Miss should have done was to mind her own business.  Miss’s presence, and her attempt to establish order was clearly an affront to whatever the students had planned for that period!  And, that young lady, that first former, that beneficiary of the “education revolution” had to let Miss know it!

I still love teaching. I just have to remember to keep my “man prablems” out of the classroom!

Why bother to plan sometimes?

Wednesday January 19, 2011: Why bother to plan sometimes?

I turned up this morning at period two to teach a social studies class in Form 3 Room 12.  I met the classroom door locked and the windows closed. There was not a single student present.  I was subsequently informed that the entire class was suspended for the day.  I did not know that!

Apparently, the students in the class did not comply with the directions of their English teacher, Miss Quashie.  They had an assignment to submit for her but failed to do so.  I am advised that the matter was brought to the attention of the principal, Mrs James.  As punishment for this infraction, the principal decided to suspend the entire class for one day!

Needless to say, I was livid.  I had spent the two previous days preparing a slideshow to be presented during that double period, the only one for the week.  In fact, it was the first slideshow to be presented to that class.  I was really looking forward to it.  But, I was thoroughly disappointed when I turned up and the students were all absent.

A few other teachers indicated to me subsequently that they were aware of the suspension.  It turned out that a notice to that effect was posted on the notice board in the staff-room.  The problem with that is this: The office of the deputy principal is on the lower floor.  There is where I spend my time when I am not engaged in instruction. So, that notice never came to my attention.  I think that I would have to visit the staff-room more often!

Another thought occured to me.  The English teacher in question, Miss Quashie, is one whom I regard as a “delinquent teacher”.  She is regularly late and regularly absent.  I therefore thought it unfair that these students had to be suspended on behalf of a delinquent teacher. Miss Quashie too, deserves some form of recrimination for her oft times unprofessional and delinquent conduct.

It may never happen! For such is the world in which we live, the powerless and disenfranchised must suffer!

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