Category Archives: Classroom Concerns

Perilous times have started in our schools!

periloustimes

Quite often these days as I engage with some of my students, this passage of scripture comes to mind:

“This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.

For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy,

Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good,

Traitors, heady, high-minded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God;

Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away.”

(2 Timothy 3:1-5, King James Version)

After all, I see all of these virulent qualities manifested in the adolescents of today, not necessarily in the majority of them but certainly, in a significant and growing minority. Timothy’s dismal prophecy appears to be coming to pass right before my very eyes.

I am therefore compelled to ask: Are we indeed in perilous times? Are we experiencing the last days? I say no way! I would never accept the notion of “last days”. This is a world without end! I may concede however, that these may be “perilous times”. But, as my mother often said, “Everything is only for a time.” Things will get better!

In the meantime, I have to find a way to deal with these covetous, proud, disobedient, unthankful, and unholy adolescents; who, according to Timothy are: “Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce,” and “despisers of those that are good…”

As a teacher, how should I respond to the fulfilment of prophecy? How can I make a difference? Should I take Timothy’s advice and “turn away”? Trust me, there are days on which I am tempted to! But, am afraid I cannot and will not turn away! I think that the bulk of our teenagers are inherently good. They however, need good guidance and an excellent education designed to steer them away from the fate described by Timothy.

For now, the times in our schools may appear perilous. But, with committed educators and caring parents, we are bound to make it better for the sake of our children. Do not turn away from them!

Should parents accept lines as a form of punishment?

Several years ago in my first year at the St. Vincent Grammar School, I was ordered to write 500 lines by my beloved geography teacher, Mr Terry Cole. This was his strategy for dealing with some infraction on my part. I cannot remember the behaviour that Mr Cole was trying to correct. But, I remember his punishment as if it were yesterday.

I think it started with a paltry 100. And for reasons I still cannot recall, the number reached up to 500. Yes, 500 lines! Now, these had to be, as Mr Cole put it, “continuous lines”! This meant that I was not given a sentence to write out repeatedly for 500 times. Instead, I had to write in continuous prose until the desired number of lines in my big hard cover notebook were filled…500! We solved the problem of what to write by copying the contents of a textbook until we reached the desired number of lines…in this case, 500!

I can’t recall how long it took me to complete that assignment. But, I do remember this: Mr Cole came to collect and I was not quite finished. In the exchange, I somehow let it slip that my mother assisted me. Big mistake! Mr Cole berated me and had me start all over! I cried like a baby.

I have been teaching for 36 plus years now and I DO NOT give students lines to write. I think it is a stupid form of punishment! Parents should unite and rebel against it.

By the way, Mr Terry Cole is still one of my favourite teachers of all times. I have fond memories of his geography classes.

Are teachers permitted to be sexy?

sexy teacher5

How far should our teachers go when it comes to dressing for the classroom? I refer particularly to our female teachers. They are the ones who tend to raise some eyebrows in this regard.

Despite the widely held notion that teachers are expected to be the standard bearers of conservatism in conduct and appearance, a growing number of our teachers have rejected this, especially the dress part. Instead, it’s all about the latest fashion; it’s all about being seen as sexy; and in the world of social media, it’s all about attracting “likes”!

In St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the competent authorities have set clear rules on how public officers, including teachers, are expected to dress for work. According to the Civil Service Orders, the following mode of dress is acceptable for women:

Dresses of sober style and cut. Pants suits and pants with tops.
Shoes – no slippers.

Teacher

Some may convincingly argue that the Civil Service Orders are woefully out of date and are not befitting the times in which we now live. Hence, we must prepare to embrace contemporary style and fashion in the workplace.

For some teachers, modern fashion means the skimpiest of the skimpy dresses; the shortest of short skirts; the tightest of tight pants and the exposure of as much bare skin as the market can bear. I must admit that they all tend to look absolutely fantastic, gorgeous, beautiful and indeed sexy!

sexy teacher4

The questions remain: Are these teachers going too far? Should the authorities put some limit on how sexy our female teachers are permitted to present themselves in the classroom?

Please, tell me, how sexy are teachers permitted to be?

5 Simple Social Media Rules for Principals

The use of social media is pervasive throughout our school system. From kindergarten to college’ every student, every teacher, the ancillary staff and yes, some principals have a social media account. However, many of us frown on the idea of making social media an integral part of school management and operations. It seems as if principals, in particular, are the ones who refuse to lead in this regard. Permit me to share with you an article (slightly adapted)  from the site School Leaders Now It gives some ideas on the use of social media by principals 

social media etiquette rules for school leaders

It’s okay to use social media as a principal or member of your school’s leadership, but your posts do need to be above reproach. Following these five simple social media etiquette rules can help you maintain a Facebook and social media presence without looking unprofessional.

1. Separate your personal/work accounts

Using your personal media accounts to stay in touch with family and friends with careful privacy boundary settings is one way to maintain social media. However, many schools additionally have social media accounts set up for their administrators and teachers. Those accounts are designed for disseminating information to your school families, teachers and staff. Be careful not to post personal updates to your school-assigned accounts. A school-provided social media account can be an excellent way to update but also a way to keep updated and share resources throughout the school’s community

2. Avoid favouritism and don’t tag anyone

Follow the authorities’ social media policy and media release guidelines when posting any photographs and videos. This is especially important if they mention school employees, students, or families. School leaders need to follow all rules of conduct in posting images or updates, even from your school-provided social media account. It’s also a good idea to avoid tagging or posting pictures of others. It’s okay if you socialize with any staff or families outside of school, but avoid posting any images or tagging them. This ensures they can maintain their privacy and you do not show favoritism toward certain students, teachers, or employees.

3. Lead by example

Your teachers, staff, parents and even students are watching your social media posts. Make sure to write positively in your posts and share updates showing pride in your school.  Also, never post under the influence or while in a compromising situation. Keep a professional distance despite the temptation to share vacation pictures or comment on pictures from your teachers or families. Lead by example. Share things that are similar to what you expect your teachers or staff to share. Fill your feed with positive posts and educational resources.

4. Join professional groups

Use social media to your best advantage as a principal by joining online organizations for support and resources. Teachers and staff may use social media for lesson plans and other helpful teaching options. Make sure the resources you find fit within curriculum guidelines and are reviewed for content. Some online options with social media for principals include: ISTEASCDNAESPNASSP, and NEA. Finally, consider how others will view your professionalism when they view the groups you belong to on Facebook, LinkedIn, or other social media platforms.

5. Control your privacy, monitor privacy laws

Carefully control your social media privacy settings and keep up with changes to privacy settings. Make your posts private and available only to your established social media friends outside of the school setting. Also, keep an eye out for intrusive, negative, or inappropriate followers on your own social media posts/pages. As an administrator, you should also take special note of applicable laws related to privacy and cyber bullying in all posts from you, your staff, teachers, and other administrators.

Taking advantage of social media as a school leader can introduce resources and improve professional communication at your school site and throughout the district. It’s one way to begin building a positive culture at your school.

 

Amy Barnes

Retrieved from: https://schoolleadersnow.weareteachers.com/social-media-etiquette-tips-school-leadership/

5 Simple Social Media Rules for Principals

The use of social media is pervasive throughout our school system. From kindergarten to college’ every student, every teacher, the ancillary staff and yes, some principals have a social media account. However, many of us frown on the idea of making social media an integral part of school management and operations. It seems as if principals, in particular, are the ones who refuse to lead in this regard. Permit me to share with you an article (slightly adapted)  from the site School Leaders Now It gives some ideas on the use of social media by principals 

social media etiquette rules for school leaders

It’s okay to use social media as a principal or member of your school’s leadership, but your posts do need to be above reproach. Following these five simple social media etiquette rules can help you maintain a Facebook and social media presence without looking unprofessional.

1. Separate your personal/work accounts

Using your personal media accounts to stay in touch with family and friends with careful privacy boundary settings is one way to maintain social media. However, many schools additionally have social media accounts set up for their administrators and teachers. Those accounts are designed for disseminating information to your school families, teachers and staff. Be careful not to post personal updates to your school-assigned accounts. A school-provided social media account can be an excellent way to update but also a way to keep updated and share resources throughout the school’s community

2. Avoid favouritism and don’t tag anyone

Follow the authorities’ social media policy and media release guidelines when posting any photographs and videos. This is especially important if they mention school employees, students, or families. School leaders need to follow all rules of conduct in posting images or updates, even from your school-provided social media account. It’s also a good idea to avoid tagging or posting pictures of others. It’s okay if you socialize with any staff or families outside of school, but avoid posting any images or tagging them. This ensures they can maintain their privacy and you do not show favoritism toward certain students, teachers, or employees.

3. Lead by example

Your teachers, staff, parents and even students are watching your social media posts. Make sure to write positively in your posts and share updates showing pride in your school.  Also, never post under the influence or while in a compromising situation. Keep a professional distance despite the temptation to share vacation pictures or comment on pictures from your teachers or families. Lead by example. Share things that are similar to what you expect your teachers or staff to share. Fill your feed with positive posts and educational resources.

4. Join professional groups

Use social media to your best advantage as a principal by joining online organizations for support and resources. Teachers and staff may use social media for lesson plans and other helpful teaching options. Make sure the resources you find fit within curriculum guidelines and are reviewed for content. Some online options with social media for principals include: ISTEASCDNAESPNASSP, and NEA. Finally, consider how others will view your professionalism when they view the groups you belong to on Facebook, LinkedIn, or other social media platforms.

5. Control your privacy, monitor privacy laws

Carefully control your social media privacy settings and keep up with changes to privacy settings. Make your posts private and available only to your established social media friends outside of the school setting. Also, keep an eye out for intrusive, negative, or inappropriate followers on your own social media posts/pages. As an administrator, you should also take special note of applicable laws related to privacy and cyber bullying in all posts from you, your staff, teachers, and other administrators.

Taking advantage of social media as a school leader can introduce resources and improve professional communication at your school site and throughout the district. It’s one way to begin building a positive culture at your school.

 

Amy Barnes

Retrieved from: https://schoolleadersnow.weareteachers.com/social-media-etiquette-tips-school-leadership/

10 Critical Personality Traits Required of Teachers

terrible teacher

There are several terrible teachers at work in our schools today. at they are unfit for purpose! Yet, they are called teachers. In all fairness, I do not think that many of the so called want to be teachers. Nevertheless, they are here wreaking havoc in the system.

I have racked my brain trying to figure out what could be responsible for the dismal performances so evident among many persons who call themselves teachers. Indeed, it is extremely difficult for me to come up with answers. Furthermore, it would take much more than this blog to catalogue  the litany of concerns with many of today’s teachers. What I can do in the meantime, however, is to make a list of critical personality traits that I would like to see demonstrated by fellow teachers.

Without giving it much thought, the following spring to mind immediately:

  1. Intelligence
  2. Creativity
  3. Resourcefulness
  4. Eloquence
  5. Compassion
  6. Empathy
  7. Commitment
  8. Curiosity
  9. Dedication
  10. Discipline

Of course, there are several teachers in our classrooms who demonstrate these traits and more. I work with some of them. They must be commended, encouraged and rewarded. Unfortunately, their work often go unnoticed.

A student loan default crisis in SVG?

student loan

The National Student Loan Programme has published a list of names and addresses of persons who have apparently defaulted on student loans over the years. In a press release carried in the Searchlight on Friday July 28, 2017, a number of persons were asked to contact the Ministry of Education by August 31, 2017.  While the release did not specifically identify these persons as defaulters, it is generally assumed that they are being summoned to make good on their commitments to the programme.

There were 112 persons named on the published list. It comprised 76 males and 36 females. The listed addresses indicated a spread throughout the entire country. The graphic below shows the distribution according to constituencies. One person’s address was listed as Canada.

Untitled

Distribution of Student Loan Defaulters According to Constituency

The publication of this list has generated quite a lot of discussion on social media. Some person  are totally against the move to, as they put it,  “name and shame” our young people. Then, there are those who think that it was neecessary to bring attention to what is emerging as an important isssue.

It would be interesting to find out why so many persons have chosen to default on loans granted to them to pursue studies. Is it a question of inability to pay back? Or, is it a question of unwillingness to pay. Whatever the situation, it must be negatively impacting on the sustainability of the National Student Loan Programme.

Most, if not all,  of the persons named on the list are gainfully employed right here in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Others have apparently migrated in search of better opportunities. Whatever the case, they clearly do not consider repayment of their student loan to be high on their list of priorities. It does not matter to them  that refusal to pay puts the progammme in jeopardy and stymies the chances of other young people seeking to finance their college and university education.

As a grateful beneficiary of similar student loans in the past, both as a student and as the parent of a student, I am in full support of any measure taken by the authorities to get persons to honour their debts in this regard,

To those who have criticized the publication of the list, I say, stop complaining! If there is anyone whom you know on the list, call them up and urge them to meet their commitments. It is the patriotic thing to do.

Finally, if any of the defaulters are reading this, do the right thing and pay up!

5 More Ways In Which We, as Teachers, Fail Our Students

Introduction

In a previous article, and much to the annoyance of several colleagues, I shared with readers 5 ways in which I think we fail our students. I listed absenteeism; tardiness; malingering; lethargic engagement; and lack of effective planning and preparation among the behaviours that thwart the academic success of our students. In this article, as promised, I share 5 more ways in which we fail our students.

1.  Deficiencies in Subject Matter Knowledge

Some teachers do demonstrate significant gaps in their knowledge base. This is perhaps true for only a small minority. However, the idea that teachers do not know much about the subjects they teach should be quite disconcerting. The dearth of knowledge may be as a result of poor pre-service preparation and failure to keep abreast with new developments in the discipline. Out-of-field teaching, i.e., the practice of deploying teachers to teach subject areas in which they have little or no expertise, is also quite common. Further, given the dynamic nature of knowledge, it is reasonable to expect gaps to emerge from time to time. However, it becomes problematic when teachers do little or nothing to correct these deficiencies.

2.  Failure to Learn from Best Practices and Exemplary Models of Teaching

Good teachers, it is often said, begin with emulating their own teachers. This suggests that one could learn from the environment in which they are expected to grow professionally. Growth also comes from reflecting on one’s own practice with a view to seeking ways to constantly improve. Another path to improvement is marked by researching best practices and exemplary models that one could adapt to one’s own context. However, many of our teachers ignore such practices. As a result, their performance in the classroom is often devoid of any effective pedagogy.

3.  Absence of Creativity and Resourcefulness

Teachers do encounter challenges in our quest to promote student success. These challenges do call on us to demonstrate creativity and resourcefulness. Sometime we have to step out of the confines of the classroom, the curriculum and even the rules, for the benefit of our students. This may be seen as going beyond the “wall of duty”. Every so often, in teaching and learning, situations arise that test our capacity to be creative and resourceful. A positive response to such circumstances, more often than not, redounds to the good of our students. Unfortunately, many of us are not prepared to be stretched and we allow precious potential teaching moments to slip by.

4.  Demonstrating Lack of Empathy and Compassion

I have heard students referred to some of us as “cold”. This is more than a slang used to describe a hard task master and strict disciplinarian. The term is also used to define teachers who show little or no empathy and compassion for the students under their care. Being an effective teacher involves much more than teaching students to excel in their studies. It also involves making a positive impact on their very souls. This requires a certain level of sensitivity to their socio-emotional needs. It also calls for a demonstrable acknowledgment of their essence as human beings. In short, empathy and compassion for our students are vitally necessary for students’ growth and development throughout life. It appears as if some teachers do not even begin to understand and accept this point.

5.  Staying on the Job despite Hatred for the Job

Some teachers hate teaching! However, they are stuck with the job since it’s a steady source of income no matter how small the salary. Should something better come along, such teachers would make a hasty exit. Teaching calls for passion, drive, discipline and commitment. Many of our teachers lack these qualities. This is evident in many of the behaviours highlighted in these articles. There are many recalcitrant teachers in the service only “marking time”. Meanwhile, their students suffer. Ronnie Thwaites, the Minister of Education in Jamaica, recently issued an impassioned plea for such teachers in that country to, “Go!” In St. Vincent a similar call from the authorities is necessary. Teachers who hate the job, for whatever reasons, should do themselves and their students a favour and just quit.

Conclusion

While the academic success of our students is dependent on a wide array of connected factors, I strongly contend that teachers and our behaviours are the most critical. Teachers are expected to teach! This involves doing everything within one’s capabilities to ensure that all of our students are successful.

Whenever students fail to learn, it means that teachers failed to teach. This statement may be platitudinous but it is nonetheless true. Currently, there are too many failing students in our schools. As teachers, we cannot and must not absolve ourselves of the blame for this situation.

First published in the Week End Searchlight of March 20, 2015

5 ways in which, we as teachers, fail our students

failing_student

Introduction

I strongly hold the view that teachers are solely responsible for the academic success of the students in their charge. This is a position I have adopted during more than three decades as a classroom practitioner with a penchant for research and reflection. During this time, I have observed and interacted with the good, the bad and the indifferent colleague in our classrooms. While the vast majority of us make a great effort to ensure the academic success of our students, there are those in the “stubborn minority” who do the exact opposite. These teachers fail our students. In this brief article, I wish to share five ways in which they do so.

1.  Absenteeism

Absenteeism among teachers is rife throughout the system. It is not unusual to have as much as 10-20% of a given staff out for the day, the entire day, every day. I challenge any school in this country that could boast of 100% teacher attendance on a consistent basis. If there is any, it is extremely rare.

Teachers fail to “show up” for a variety of reasons. These may include illness, personal business, workshops, and meetings, all of which are “legitimate”. There are also those who simply fail to show. Consider what this means for a school and classroom when even the smallest number of teachers are absent on a regular basis.

2.  Tardiness

Compounding the issue of absenteeism is that of tardiness. Several teachers arrive to school late. In some schools, there are teachers who “stroll” in long after the first bell, prayers, assembly and roll-call. They are hardly ever present to participate in the traditional routines that signal the commencement of each school day.

At some institutions, chaos ensues and persists at the beginning of each day as some principals struggle to establish order in the wake of absent and tardy teachers. Indeed, I do believe that some students see no need to   be there on time since “Miss” or “Sir will not be there!

3.  Malingering

This, for me, is perhaps the most annoying practice of all, malingering. Teachers are present but they “choose” not to attend to their classes in a timely manner. Instead of reporting to class, these teachers sit around and gossip in the staffroom; they huddle in small groups in the office; they stand around on the corridor or some other place; they pause on their way to class and take time to make or take a phone call, invariably on their Smartphones. Some even find the slightest of reasons to return to the staffroom and just linger until the bell rings to signal a change of session. One can only imagine the enormous amount instructional time that goes to waste as a result the annoying practice of malingering.

4.  Lethargic engagement

This is another way of saying that some teachers are lackadaisical. They go into the classroom and do little or nothing to effectively engage their students. They may scrawl something on the chalkboard then sit as their charges “take charge”. Some of them turn their backs to the class and attempt to fill the board with “notes”. They may even sit at the teacher’s desk as one half of the class crowd around them while the rest are left up to their own devices. Indeed, casual observation often reveals a teacher who refuses to or is unable to connect with the students under her care. It appears to be the result of lethargy. Hence, I refer to such behaviour as “lethargic engagement”.

5. Lack of effective planning and preparation

The best lessons are the result of extensive planning and preparation. Unfortunately, this point has been lost on many of our teachers. Unprepared lessons end abruptly or go long over the stipulated time. The objectives, if any, are never ever achieved. The classes tend to lack focus and both teacher and students show little or no enthusiasm during the session. Although it is a requirement that teachers write lesson plans, quite a number of them fail to do so.  Instead they appear to be guided by “old notes” in their possession. Or, they move from chapter to chapter in a slavish commitment to a prescribed text. In the end, very little is accomplished and our students suffer the harmful consequences

Conclusion

The essential role of the teacher in students’ academic success cannot be over emphasized. Unfortunately, there exist a significant number of colleagues throughout the system who engage in behaviours and practices that negate our mission as educators. I have touched on a few. In a subsequent article I propose to examine five other sets of behaviours among colleagues that are responsible for the failure of so many students to achieve academic success.

First published in the Mid Week Searchlight of March 17, 2015

Who is accountable?

IMG-20141129-00039

 

As a parent, you send your child to school with the reasonable expectation that she would be safe. You expect that the school authorities, teachers and administrators, would do whatever is necessary within the ambit of applicable rules, regulation and laws to ensure that your child is educated in a safe environment. But, lo and behold, your child suffers a grave bodily injury, allegedly, due to the apparent neglect of the said authorities. What do you do? What are your options?

A few weeks ago, a local newspaper reported that a young female student lost sight in on of her eyes after a “one sided” with a male student. This incident is alleged to have occurred in the classroom. It is said that the young lady was struck repeatedly in the right eye, resulting in a complete loss of sight. Subsequent reports revealed that the alleged perpetrator of this heinous act was arrested and charged by the police. Up to the point of writing this, he was on bail and awaiting trial.

This incident, horrible as it is, raises a number of questions in my mind. Apart from the obvious culpability of the offending student and ultimately his parents, what of the school, the teachers, the principal and the authorities? Should they not be held liable for dereliction of duties? What was the school’s role in preventing such an incident from occurring? Can the authorities and all those responsible be sued? What if it were your child, how would you have responded?

In light of the facts as reported in the press, I would like to make a few general observations. A few of our secondary schools are staffed by some delinquent teachers and weak administrators. They often combine to engender a school climate in which declining discipline and disorder become rampant. It is in such a climate that children are allowed to engage in rowdy and violent acts such as the one in question. When grave injury is the suffered by a student, should we not hold teachers and administrators culpable?

Arrest the decline in school discipline now!

discipline

If a school cannot instill discipline, what is the point?

I am veteran teacher in the secondary school system. I have given over thirty years of service to our nation’s children. Ever so often though, I have to protest loudly against the mess that we allow to persist. I write today about the growing prevalence of indiscipline and the apparent enthronement thereof.

The appalling conduct of of many students manifest itself in several ways. Among these are:

  • chronic late coming;
  • unexcused absences;
  • refusal to bring required material to class;
  • absconding from classes;
  • engaging in violent behaviour;
  • wanton acts of vandalism;
  • disrespect for each other and those in authority;
  • open defiance;
  • lewd and despicable behaviour.

Sometimes the situation is so terrible that one gets the distinct impression that students “run things”. Furthermore, the despicable conduct is often supported by parents and even the wider community.

Efforts to effectively address the problems associated with indiscipline are often met with resistance, particularly from misguided parents. At times, the response from the competent authorities can at best be describe as apathetic. They often appear unwilling to or incapable of confronting these issues head on. Hence, principals and teachers are all but helpless in the midst of this growing culture of indiscipline in our schools. But, if a school cannot instill discipline, what is the point?

To be sure, there are many decent students who show up. They are regular and punctual; they complete all assigned tasks in pursuit of their education; and above all, they conduct themselves in an appropriate manner at all times. However, our frustration comes from those who are bent on doing the exact opposite. Indeed, they are the ones in charge!

Is it any wonder then, that across the nation that academic performance is barely mediocre? Should we be surprised at the unacceptable rates of class repetition; dropouts and the high levels of failure on tests of basic competencies in literacy and numeracy?

Left as it is, the problem of indiscipline in schools tend to translate into scores  of youths, mainly males, who offend the legal system on a regular basis. Indeed, there could well be a direct link between the decline in discipline and what appears to be a growing crime wave, particularly among the youths.

This is a simple plea for us to arrest the problem before it gets further out of control. The schools, the authorities, the parents and and the wider community must get together and carefully examine the situation. We should then collaboratively craft strategies  that are designed to stem the decline in discipline and decorum among our young people.

Should we get rid of bad teachers?

Here is the link to a story recently carried by the Jamaica Gleaner. Read it! Could this be about SVG too? Is it not time that we start such a discussion? I am ready. Are you?

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20120624/lead/lead1.html#.T-ijdmdpryU.email

From Note Books to Net Books: Isn’t it time to abandon the black board?

Writing notes

 I have a six-year old friend who entered grade one last September.  This was the beginning of his second year in primary school.  I was going through my friend’s book bag (which I thought was quite big and heavy for a six-year old) when I came across a 100 page hard cover note book.  I asked my friend what was he doing with this big “note book” in his bag. He responded, “Miss say we have to bring it to write notes”. Write notes? At six?

Here is another situation that plays itself out over and over on a daily basis.  Almost every time I enter a classroom, I meet the black board filled with “notes”.  Invariably, I have to give the students a few minutes of my period to “write down” the notes that Miss or Sir left for them. And, as you may well appreciate, all 80 square feet of the black board is emblazoned with “notes” from left to right and top to bottom.

It is therefore no wonder that the typical teen-ager finds school to be excruciatingly boring.  After all, they are made to sit for hours and copy badly written “notes” from a black board.  Alternatively, they must listen and write as Miss or Sir “call notes”.  Unfortunately for the children of the 21st century; the children of the education revolution; “notes calling” and “notes writing” still remain as significant instructional strategies for too many teachers.

As a student, I found “notes calling” and “notes writing” to be painfully monotonous. I simply could not keep up.  I often waited eagerly for my teacher to pause and offer some “explanation” of his or her  “notes”.  In fact, I even developed the technique of deliberately asking a slew of questions to delay the resumption of “notes calling” or “notes writing”. It did not always work though! With the urgency of covering the material foremost in their minds, my teachers would stop the questioning and stick to their notes!

As a teacher of history and social studies, two subjects notorious for “notes”, I choose not to “dictate notes”.  I never did and I never will.  Furthermore, I use the black board sparingly. In fact despite Charles Best’s excellent tutoring at the SVG Teachers College, I never learnt to apply the effective uses of the black board in my classroom!

 

We are now in the digital age and all that it implies.  I prefer to refer to these times as the post black board era.  Today, there are countless effective alternatives to “calling” and “copying” notes.  Yet, the practice is still so ubiquitous in our school system.  That is why I am calling on the SVG Teachers Union to conduct a series PD workshops on the theme: Making the Black Board Obsolete-  Interesting Alternatives for Engaging Students with Educational Material.

In the meantime, I feel it for those six-year olds like my young friend who have to lug a bag of hard cover note books to and from school and who must sit and copy copious notes from the black board or as Miss dictates. Perhaps, all of this would be eliminated when every child and every teacher are in posession of the digital tools to make teaching and learning engaging, exciting and enlightening in this the digital age.

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